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Other events in Cambridge

Sensing the Earth

Wheelchair access to all areas. Visual impairments: well-lit and airy, clear menus. Hearing Impairments: Generally quiet, no music. Free parking immediately outside restaurant.
Past event - 2017
17 May Doors open 6:30pm; Event 7:00pm-9:00pm
The Boathouse 14 Chesterton Rd,
Cambridge CB4 3AX
Sold Out!
Our energetic planet is explosive in power, dynamic in colour, and a good ol' rattle and shaker. How do we know this? We sense it and monitor it using tools like satellites and drones. Come along to get a real sense on how we monitor our planet. Please note that this event takes places on the first floor and is not accessible for those with impaired mobility.  

A Remote Sense of Volcanoes

Satellite remote sensing can be used to study long-term trends in volcanic unrest, such as sulphur dioxide gas emissions or deformation of the Earth's surface, from individual volcanoes through a regional area and on up to a global scale. For example, the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), a satellite-based ultraviolet (UV) spectrometer, provides daily observations of SO2 gas emissions from volcanoes worldwide. I will review advances in the use of satellites to assess volcano related hazards especially in remote regions of the world where ground-based monitoring infrastructure is sparse.
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Light on the Edge of Space

The atmosphere extends far beyond what many people think of as the edge of space. The Sun’s light drives our atmosphere yet, at great heights the links between the magnetic fields of the Sun and the Earth are very important. This causes one of the most dazzling displays in nature: the Aurora. These lights on the edge of space tell us about explosive events in space. I will discuss why the science of the Aurora is important and how we use instruments to sense this part of our Planet.
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Earthquakes: Breaking News

Earthquakes can destroy towns and cities in a matter of seconds and, with global population increasing, it seems like it will be only a matter of time before the "million death quake". Knowing where we expect earthquakes to happen, and how big they might be, can help people to be prepared and, ultimately, save lives. But what if we can't travel to the places we want to know about? Can we find the faults which cause earthquakes from space? How fast does the ground have to move for a satellite to spot it? And why does the BBC always print rainbows after an earthquake?
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Other events in The Boathouse

14 Chesterton Rd, Cambridge, CB4 3AX 14 Chesterton Rd, Cambridge, CB4 3AX
14 Chesterton Rd, Cambridge, CB4 3AX 14 Chesterton Rd, Cambridge, CB4 3AX
15 May
Cambridge
Sold Out!
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It’s a Risky Business

Soc 19 Stop SIgn