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The magic and mystery of molecules

16
May

doors open 7pm, starts 7:30pm, end 9:30pm

The Steam Crane 4-6 North Street,
Southville, Bristol BS3 1HT


This evening will take you back in history! We'll hear how the analysis of  molecules in archaeological findings like pottery can tell us what our  ancestors had for dinner. And how did dinosaurs keep their joints  lubricated so they could flee from  a T-Rex?

 

Mendeley
milk

Milk and molecules

Julie Dunne (Postdoctoral Research Assistant, Organic Geochemistry Unit, University of Bristol)

or how small molecules from ancient pottery tell us what people were eating in in the past.
Julie will be talking about how small molecules extracted from thousands of years old pottery can be used to look at what people ate. Their molecular distributions and isotopic values will tell us what foods were cooked in the vessels. This has allowed us to build up a picture of when, where and how the first farmers started to drink milk and make butter, cheese and yoghurt. This is important because it is then that the human evolution of the lactase persistence gene occurs, allowing us to drink milk.

Nature’s secret lubricants: From dinosaurs’ knee joints to artificial hip replacements

Wuge Briscoe (Senior Lecturer in Physical Chemistry, University of Bristol)

The remarkable ease with which some biological tissue surfaces glide over each other (e.g. in eye blinking and knee joints) has long puzzled and humbled us. However, our understanding of the enigmatic mechanism for biolubrication remains limited. We propose a mechanism that points to the fluidity of water molecules as the key to unlock nature’s secrets in biolubrication.

16
May

doors open 7pm, starts 7:30pm, end 9:30pm

The Steam Crane 4-6 North Street,
Southville, Bristol BS3 1HT


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