Other events in Durham

Analysing Antiquity

Analysing Antiquity

17
May

7:30pm - 10pm (Doors @ 7pm)

Head of Steam 3 Reform Place, North Road,
Durham DH1 4RZ


Understanding our scientific history, and our world's history through science. PLEASE NOTE: this event takes place on the first floor and is not accessible for those with impaired mobility.

Andy Beeby

Illuminating History: Studying Medieval Manuscripts with Modern Spectroscopy

Professor Andrew Beeby (Professor in the Department of Chemistry, Durham University)

Medieval manuscripts, with their wonderful coloured illuminations, are an enduring and captivating reminder of the skills of the past. Many, now more than 1400 years old, still have vibrant and vivid colours. Team Pigment, a collection of scientists, historians and conservators, have developed a range of portable scientific equipment to study a wide range of books across Britain. We’ll demonstrate some of the techniques developed to identify these pigments without causing any damage to these beautiful documents, using UV, visible and infra-red radiation to reveal things hidden to the eye.

X Rays and Excavation Pots Powders and Photons

X-Rays and Excavation: Pots, Powders and Photons

Dr Ivana Evans (Reader in the Department of Chemistry, Durham University)

We’ll look at how popular scientific techniques can contribute to cultural heritage science. We’ll discuss, with specific examples, how these techniques can help with all kinds of archaeological and conservation work, from archaeometric studies of medieval Byzantine pottery (dating, provenancing and studying object manufacture processes) to how X-ray diffraction helped conserve an Egyptian bronze statue over 2500 years old!

The Medevil Big Bang edit2

The Medieval Big Bang

Professor Richard Bower (Professor in the Institute for Computational Cosmology and Member of the Ordered Universe Project, Durham University)

How old is the Universe? How was it created? What will happen in the future? These are questions addressed by modern cosmologists, using the "laws of physics" and state-of-the art supercomputers to simulate how the Universe is created. However, these aren’t new questions; they are probably as old as human consciousness. We will look at how this picture has changed over the millennia; how work with the Ordered Universe project has led to amazing computer simulations of Robert Grosseteste’s medieval explanation of the origin of the Universe, and contrast this with our contemporary understanding.

17
May

7:30pm - 10pm (Doors @ 7pm)

Head of Steam 3 Reform Place, North Road,
Durham DH1 4RZ


Other events in Durham

Other events in Head of Steam