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Other Liverpool events

Deadly Diseases and Creepy Crawlies

Event is downstairs in The Hold. Access by stairs only. Food available from upstairs bar before event.
Past event - 2022
10 May Doors 7pm
Event 7.30pm to 9.30pm
The Shipping Forecast, 15 Slater Street,
Liverpool L1 4BW
Sold Out!
PLEASE NOTE: DUE TO A RE-SCHEDULING OF THE LIVERPOOL MATCH THIS EVENT WILL BE MOVED TO THE SHIPPING FORECAST ON SLATER STREET.

Join us on our journey of “Deadly Diseases and Creepy Crawlies”, with researchers from the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine (LSTM). The trailblazers from LSTM will take you on a journey to explore how they are working to end the scourge of deadly diseases including tuberculosis and malaria.

Where have all the mosquitoes gone?

Dr Julie-Anne Tangena (Post Doctoral Research Associate)
Malaria control has had great success in Africa. Bednets and spraying insecticides indoors has helped decrease malaria cases by one third in the last two decades. Unfortunately, the mosquitoes are adapting their behaviour to avoid control methods. Now, malaria transmitting mosquitoes often bite outdoors earlier in the day when people are not protected by bednets. In 2020 there were still an estimated 241 million malaria cases with 627.000 malaria deaths worldwide. We are now in a race to adapt our surveillance and control methods to keep up with the ever-changing mosquito.
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The sweet Achilles’ heel of COVID-19

Dr Aitor Casas-Sanchez (Post-Doctoral Research Associate)
Two years ago, we all witnessed the devastating consequences of a new viral disease, COVID-19, spreading around the world. Scientists quickly started to research ways to fight it and, as one of them, Aitor applied their skills to look closely at sugars the virus uses to modify its infamous Spike proteins. In this talk, Aitor will walk you through the fascinating journey that took them to discover the importance of sugars for COVID-19 and how they envisage these can be exploited to treat, not only COVID-19, but also future viruses with pandemic potential.
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How can we end the world’s second deadliest infectious disease?

Dr Kerry Millington (Research Uptake Manager)
Professor Bertie Squire (Professor of Clinical Tropical Medicine)
Behind Covid-19, tuberculosis is the second deadliest infectious disease across the world with more than 4100 TB-related deaths every day. But why is this disease still here centuries on and having such a devastating impact? Progress in ending this disease was being made, albeit slowly, and with political commitment, but this progress has been set back by more than a decade by the COVID-19 pandemic. Over a pint, Bertie and Kerry will discuss, gender inequitable access to TB care and prevention – reasons why and research being undertaken to provide some solutions.
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