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Other London events

Outlandish and Extreme Foods of Earth & Mars

Please note this event takes place on the first floor and has no step-free access. Over 18s only
Past event - 2022
10 May Doors 6.30pm
7.30pm to 9.00pm
Greenwich Tavern, 1 King William Walk,
London SE10 9JH
Pickles, Poison and Ponics: We will take you from the history of new foods emergence, to the stories of food poising in fiction and reality, then to future of food on Mars.

How did our 17th and 18th century ancestors cope with eating and drinking new foods like potatoes, chocolate and tomatoes? The persistent myth of the female poisoner and the origins of this myth.

What is aquaponics, why we need it and how we take aquaponics into the Cosmos? Feeding Martians and Moonians- Taste testing aquaponic produce and the ethics of taking fish into space.

Aquaponics, Mars and Future Food Production

Dr Benz Kotzen (Head of Green Roofs, Living Walls & Aquaponics Labs Centre at the University of Greenwich)
@BenzKotzen
Lorenzo Fruscella (PhD Researcher - organic aquaponic )
What is aquaponics, why we need it and how we take aquaponics into the Cosmos? Feeding Martians and Moonians- Taste testing aquaponic produce and the ethics of taking fish into space.
Pictures and videos from our Stockwell St. facilities (glasshouses, green roofs, etc.
An ethical discussion as to why humans should ‘colonise’ Mars in the first place, and whether bringing sentient beings (fish) there is something that we should do.
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FEEDING MARS: M.A.R.S. MARS AQUAPONIC RESEARCH STUDY

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The gendered nature of poisoning crimes?

Dr Sarah Kilbane (Senior Lecturer in Criminology)
@DrSarahKilbane
In fictional works of literature the same ideas tend to repeatedly come up; that those who engage in poisoning crimes are cowardly, conniving, manipulative – and female. Through the examination of popular tropes and psychological mechanisms, this presentation will explore the persistent myth of the female poisoner, the origins of this myth, and why it may persist despite being inconsistent with reality.
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Historical recipes that deal with novel ingredients

Dr Sara Pennell (Senior Lecturer in History)
@HistorySara
How did our 17th and 18th century ancestors cope with eating and drinking new foods like potatoes, chocolate and tomatoes? What worries accompanied such new foods (for example, Samuel Pepys worried that he might be poisoned by drinking orange juice), and how did domestic cooks incorporate new ingredients into their repertoires, and avoid poisoning themselves (I have never made the dish that one 18th century woman included a recipe for in her manuscript recipe book, for the toxic 'fruit' of the potato plant above ground, for example).
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